The Gag-shop set of paintings

In this series for Megami-no-ai (Love of Goddess) the Japanese femdom magazine, I invited four internationally renowned mistresses to pose for each frame of a set of four paintings. They all willingly agreed to lend their assistance in providing photographic reference and it was a pleasure to collaborate with them. The theme of the set is a gag-shop.Yes, a specialised store only selling gags.

anmonight_gag

I was inspired by this fascinating drawing of Japanese femdom artist Anmo Night and wondered how it might be if a shop actually existed in reality where they could be bought.

gagshop1

In No. 1 Mistress Akella is walking down the street with a ‘dog’ on her leash carrying her purchases on his back. In the background is the gag-shop.

gagshop2

As we move into No. 2 we see Mistress Ezada Sinn looking in through the window of the shop, perhaps deciding which gag the dog beside her will be buying. gagshop3

 In No. 3 we have moved inside the shop and see Madame Catarina inspecting the various gags in the shop. There are some really exotic varieties here. In the background another lady has just bought some gags and the sales-assistant is wrapping them up for her.

gagshop4

In No 4 we see that lady herself, Lady Victoria Valente looking menacingly at her own slave who has spilt her purchases all over the street. There will be consequences for him! In the background we glimpse Mistress Akella again which brings us satisfyingly round to the first frame again.   This is not the last word on the gag-shop series. Mistress Ezada, who appeared in the second frame, has had the fantastic idea of re-enacting the scene with all the other mistresses in a locale in Germany. Read more on this story here… http://mistressezada.com/the-gag-shop-enactment/

and see what happened in this post

Portrait of Mistress Kelle Martina

This was a commission to paint a portrait of
Mistress Kelle Martina
http://kellemartina.com

A3 size colour watercolour.

km1

An initial sketch was made on rough paper then scanned into the computer . I prefer to sketch things out on paper-it is also possible to sketch on the computer using drawing software ( Corel Painter ), but I find I can get better results the conventional way.

km2

On the scanned drawing I experiment digitally with colours and tonal balance. Digital is best here for colour roughs as you can change it so easily. This is printed out and the line-work is transferred down on to thick watercolour paper-(for the geeks this is 300gsm Saunders Waterford HP).
Everything is worked out except fine details before the artwork is started. Trying to draw straight on to the paper without planning is asking for trouble.

km3

First lines lightly sketched using diluted black paint. Just as a guide. It will be strengthened later . To the left a sheet of photo references is always to hand.

km4

Now areas of tone start to be blocked in. This need not be too fine as they are going so dark anyway any imperfections can be covered.

km5

More blocking in. The colouring is gradually built up.

km7

At this stage you begin to start balancing all the tones out. I feel that the subject should be glowing so she is the lightest part of the picture. Everything else is dark in comparison to her. This lightness is of course the whiteness of the paper coming through, the unique property of watercolour. Painting white onto watercolour paint is occasionally necessary but is to be avoided as much as possible.

km8

Then you can allow yourself the luxury of cleaning up the details. My basic principle is to work from general to detail. Never to get bogged down in one part at the expense of others. It is very tempting to work up the “interesting bits”- face, etc. and then get depressed looking at all the unpainted background. I feel the best approach is to bring up all the picture together stage by stage.

mskelle

The finished painting.

Interested in a commission?

Please visit www.sardax.com to see this and many others.

The Sardax Circus

The Sardax Circus is an occasional series I add to whenever it is commissioned, themed around traditional circus acts.
Well-known mistresses in U.K. and abroad are featured in this truly “femdom” event.

Mistress Sidonia

The ringmistress of the circus is Mistress Sidonia introducing us to the proceedings. http://www.theenglishmansion.com

Mistress Akella

An experienced equestrienne herself Mistress Akella rides bareback on one of the male “horses”. http://www.mistressakella.com

Mistress Arella

Walking on a bridge of interlocked males, Mistress Arella walks with an umbrella high up in the circus. http://elite-femdom.com

Lady Nina Birch

Lady Nina Birch and her performing troop of tame sissies jumping through a hoop of fire. http://www.ladyninabirch.com

Madame Caramel

Madame Caramel on her very own human trapeze swings high up in the big top. http://www.madamecaramel.com

Would you like to be in the Sardax Circus?

Contact admin@sardax.com for more info on commissioning or see http://www.sardax.com.

Portrait of Modern Empress

This was a commission to paint a portrait of
“Modern Empress” www.modernempress.co.uk

me1

It is A3 size. An initial sketch is made usually on rough paper then scanned into the computer and some indication of tone  is worked out on the file produced. This digital drawing is printed out and the line-work is transferred down on to thick watercolour paper.
(for the geeks this is 300gsm Saunders Waterford HP)

me2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first outlines are traced out in diluted black watercolour paint to define main areas of tone.

me3

Now darker areas of tone are blocked in. This need not be too fine as they are going so dark anyway any imperfections can be covered.

me4

Now comes a gradual definition of tones according to the sketch…

me5

..and of the background too.The tones are gradually worked up

me6

Background is worked up so that it is defined but does not take the attention away from the main character

me7

At this stage you begin to start balancing all the tones out. I feel that the subject should be glowing so she is the lightest part of the picture. Everything else is dark in comparison to her. This lightness is of course the whiteness of the paper coming through, the unique property of watercolour. Painting white onto watercolour paint is occasionally necessary but is to be avoided as much as possible.

modern_empress_cave

The finished painting.

My basic principle is to work from general to detail. Never to get bogged down in one part at the expense of others. It is very tempting to work up the “interesting bits”- face etc and then get depressed looking at all the unpainted background. I feel the best approach is to bring up all the picture together stage by stage.

Interested in a commission?

Please visit www.sardax.com to see this and many others.