Princess Aurora 2

As she was so pleased with her portrait as Kinky Alice, Manchester based humiliatrix Princess Aurora hinted to one of her long-time admirers that she would like a similar drawing to go alongside it and this was the resulting piece.
She gave a very free brief, but only requested that the costume should feature a pleated skirt.

In this drawing Princess Aurora takes time to visit her dungeon, where some of her giant-sized prisoners of desire press forward against the solid steel bars for the chance to see her and delicately kiss her fingernails.

Princess Aurora holding her new drawing

Learn more about Sardax portraiture and commissioning at the main Sardax website

Please remember if you are commissioning for a birthday or anniversary to leave a few months as there is usually a waiting list for commissioned artwork.

Portrait of Lady Salome

Lady Salome, a mistress from Germany, wished for a fantasy-based theme and taking her name as a starting-off point we thought of a head on a silver platter, though that seemed a little gruesome. A skull with tongue licking her feet seemed a better idea. She wears a rather fetishy medieval dress and carries a sword (perhaps of justice?) Behind her a traditional German castle and a small reference to the other Biblical Salome of a crucifix on the railings. In addition to the classic watercolour treatment a very thin layer of red ink was added to the hair and tongue of the skull.

Lady Salome stands before the framed and hung painting


Portrait of Mistress Michelle Lacy 2

The first portrait of South Florida and New York based Mistress Michelle Lacy was so well received that the commissioner, her favourite “pony pet”, planned a companion piece for Christmas, but this time including himself standing to her left.
As in the first, another mistress rides a buggy in the background at Mistress Michelle’s fantastic open-air play Order of Indomitus 

Learn more about Sardax portraiture and commissioning  at the main Sardax website

Please remember if you are commissioning for a birthday or anniversary to leave a few months as there is usually a waiting list for commissioned artwork.

The Female Gaze

There is a simplistic idea going round in erotica marketing that women respond to words and men to pictures.  This sounds true, judging by the the sales of erotic novels to women and videoclips to men, but I think the truth is more complex. From some conversations with dominant women who had taken it upon themselves to tell me what I ought to be doing (bless them), I learnt that they aren’t generally interested in femdom photos or videos simply because it had no “eye candy” for them. Instead of focussing on a good-looking male this media tends to linger on the dominant female actress, which is off-putting for them, and any males in the scene are secondary, certainly not chosen for their looks or acting ability. There are notable exceptions, but as most visual content is produced for men any content designed for women tends to get ignored and women seem to stop even looking for anything appealing.  So it was initially surprising for me but on reflection quite logical that for them gay porn was their choice of viewing. I understood this but could not see how I could do anything to affect the disparity.
But these ladies could be persuasive and so, at their instigation, I tried to address this with a few pieces for what has come to be called “The Female Gaze” – that might appeal to this untapped female market and give a few new subscriptions to the member-site I was running at the time (2004-14).
Drawing in this way was an interesting process, like driving on the opposite side of the road – familiar landmarks and same direction but a different focus and view, through guessing what the female might prefer rather than just knowing. This series was one such -“Down Below”

My friends expressed satisfaction with this series – they particularly liked the suffering eyes – but I felt no immediate desire to continue working this way.  I knew my core market was men and straying too far from that would alienate them. I put up a few pieces now and then “for the ladies” such as this -“Moonlight”, but let the matter rest as I felt it was for a female artist to develop it further.


So I was pleased recently to get to know about a new venture called Dreams Made Flesh run by a Canadian lifestyle domme . It is run on the patreon system whereby the contributions fund artists and writers who are developing this field. As you can see it’s not just Female Gaze then but Female Ear too, but I believe it’s not just for women anyway. Men can enjoy this focus equally and if they care anything about what women like (I mean-isn’t that the scene ?) then it is something that should be sponsored.

here are a few thumbnails of previous drawings – there will be more in coming months.



A posthumous portrait


A few times in the course of my career I have been asked to make posthumous portraits. (for partners or mistresses who have unfortunately passed on)
While the portraits are not in themselves generally difficult, the circumstances surrounding the commission have to be handled sensitively as they can be affected by grief and emotion. An artwork commissioned at an emotional intensity one month can become problematic through onset of depression a few months later. Moreover the feelings of other close relatives have to be considered besides that of the partner – who is usually the commissioner.
One time on receiving his portrait the widower told me touchingly – “It was what she always wanted -but we never got round to it.”
Last year I was approached by S. who wanted to commemorate the relationship with his beloved mistress and partner- Mistress Mariska. He sent me photos of her and I tried my best to draw it as he -and perhaps she -might want it.

He has given his permission now to make this portrait public.

Christmas sketching

Shortly before Christmas I was fortunate enough to attend a lovely play-party given by Nikki Whiplash, whose portrait I completed recently. My role was however not to play, though I did enjoy myself immensely. During ball-busting events and other intense games with the male guests in the main dungeon, I sat in an adjoining room and sketched four of the stunning mistresses in turn, using a mixture of pencils, pen and red crayon. A messy combination but for working fast it seems to work.

Domina Araneae

Goddess Sophia

Chloe Lovette

Cate Fury

This is the magic of drawing – of art in general – 20 minutes before there was only a blank sheet of paper and a pen. After 20 minutes an image of themselves which they were (visibly) happy to receive and take home*.
The sketch will remain there and can be looked at whenever they want. Unlike an experience which lasts only as long as the activity causing it.

My mission was complete – I enjoyed seeing their smiles and giggles, like some party magician, and I drank up my sherry and indulged in the mince pies provided.

Thank you Nikki for putting on such a lovely party!


*It’s not always successful. Sometimes I just can’t get it right but generally it works out ok


Patrons -those who commission artwork – are the enablers of the professional artist.

Increasingly in the age of instant gratification on the Net we lose sight of the fact that behind many professional images and videos there has been someone, somewhere to finance it happening . This has become obscured by the freedom with which anything now is stolen copied.

Before the web this was self evident. Patrons paid for the services of creatives – not always well – but understood that expenses were necessary or nothing would happen. Throughout history if an artist was not paid, there would be no culture, so princes, popes, etc. would dip into their treasure chests to finance creative projects. Sometimes they paid huge sums to secure the services of the best artists in Europe, like Rubens or Bernini. Others like Vermeer were largely neglected, and had constant money problems. Yet still there was the general understanding they needed to be paid. But still now some do not recognise that artists have bills to pay like everyone else and if they can’t make it pay then the art won’t happen.

I grew up in a creative family and money – or rather the lack of it – was the root of many problems. Our human needs were the same as everyone else, shelter, food, bills to pay and yet art was not considered “real work”, presumably as it didn’t make a profit for any shareholder. Constantly around us our family was met with the same incomprehension. Art was considered a leisure activity, and not expected to earn anything. You’d be right in assuming I was encouraged to do any work but art! 

In my own career I have been paid to contribute to magazines (remember them?), femdom member sites, my own member site ( 2004-2014) and now mainly working on bespoke portraiture. In all we were reliant on people making a financial contribution. I have been fortunate in mostly having a public (often creative themselves) who understood this. Generally artists do not become professional to earn a fortune. If that happens – fine …but I don’t think many start with that in mind. They soon discover it’s not that easy.

So as a farewell to 2017 this post is a thanks to all patrons who have tried to keep me afloat financially however much they can manage, so I can concentrate on what I do best – doing the artwork. 

This is not a post about my own work but here is a photo of the Last Judgement from the Sistine Chapel for which have to thank not only Michaelangelo, but also Pope Julius II who had the vision to commission it.

(In this post I use the term arts but it could apply equally to any creative endeavour)