Mistress Tess in Furs

As you will have seen in the dedicated page to Venus in Furs , the book is a great favourite of Mistress Tess and this watercolour was intended to be in the style of those paintings – the classic monochrome style which gives such a sense of cool mystery and eroticism.
She specified a cuckolding scene where she would be lying on a silk bed beside her well-endowed black lover, while her Louboutin heels are worshipped by a lowly well-whipped submissive, the commissioner of the painting. Obviously she hardly needs to hold the leash connected to his collar.
On the bed you can also see Mistress Tess’ favourite pink whip produced by Essentia Whips.

Please see Commissions page for more information on commissioning a portrait.

Venus in Furs text illustrations

This small gallery shows just six of the twenty text illustrations to be seen in the printed version of my “Venus in Furs”.
They were produced digitally in the style of old-fashioned books where drawings were made to placed within the text and run round by it; so-called “page furniture”.
How many books published as novels today have that level of illustration?
Together with a special title page and end of chapter illustrations this book was designed from the start as a luxury item.

See the dedicated page Venus in Furs book for further information about ordering the book.

Please note there is also an e-book for sale – while it contains the ten full-page illustrations these   text illustrations were omitted as it was impossible to wrap the text round them.

Venus in Fur

No, not “Venus in Furs” !

It is  “Venus in Fur” without the ‘s’.

It is not a play of the book. Well it is, indirectly.

This is a stage play – and a film now – about a stage director who is auditioning actresses for his own adaptation of the book “Venus in Furs”, and almost in despair of never finding the right one, allows a final audition to an outwardly trashy actress, who not only surprises him by her amazing acting  as the play progresses , but also completely turns his life around.

Confused yet? I was when I first heard of the play. Like many outside the theatre-going public it was when film director Roman Polanski announced he was going to produce his own adaptation in a French translation, with his wife Emmanuelle Seigner and Mathieu Amalric in the lead roles. I naturally assumed it was a dramatisation of the book itself. In fact there are only two actors in the entire play so when I first read about it and then later saw the stills from the movie I was admittedly cool about it.
After all, how could the whole of Venus in Furs be dramatised on stage with only two actors?

Of course I did not make the distinction.

But people kept asking me what I thought of the film (because of my translation and illustrations I was now thought of as some authority, maybe) so in the end I relented, thinking I had to base an opinion and so I sat grimly through the first few minutes. Rather like the director on stage Thomas Novachek (not the director of the play itself, by the way) who gradually warms to the personality of actress Vanda Jordan, I warmed to the script as I realised that the play’s author David Ives really understood the book itself and I started to enjoy the way the two characters reacted to each other and was thoroughly won over as the film ended.

So when the play finally came to Theatre Royal Haymarket in London I was enthusiastic to see it. In company with Mistress Tess and her admirer, we saw Natalie Dormer as Vanda and David Oakes as Thomas in a production directed by Patrick Marber. I was pleased at last to hear it in English instead of subtitled from the French film and it quite lived up to my expectations. Lots of great comic and insightful moments that really reflected the whole dynamic between Severin and Wanda in the original book. On speaking to other mistresses I learnt how it had affected them:-

Mistress Harpsichord  “Venus in fur genuinely moved me to tears. There was something so powerful about the performance that I struggle to put into words. It was honest, relateable and devastatingly beautiful.”

Lady Lola “I adored Venus in Fur, it came as no surprise as I am a big fan of the movie.Incredible performances and overall tone. Close to the bone on many occasions but all done with a playful dialogue.”

Any reader of this blog who is interested in femdom (and isn’t that all of you?) is encouraged to beg, steal or borrow a ticket!

The London run continues until December 9th.

See the Play Website

The Weimar Series

This recent series – made for Japanese magazine “Goddess love” (女神の愛) takes the theme of a drinking-club in 1920’s Germany, at the time of the Weimar Republic, where the main female characters are played by world-famous mistresses. I wanted to show a decadent and raffish atmosphere, but add a sense of nostalgia for a past period of modern history.
This is a club run by females for females, but also for subservient men so long as they are well behaved and paying :- if not, a strict management policy is enforced!


1. In the first scene Domina Liza, dressed in an opulent fur coat, is shown pointing to the illuminated entrance of the club. Her besotted and extremely wealthy slave will be required to take her inside for an exorbitantly expensive evening.


2. Now we see Lady Lola, playfully teasing a waiter who is dressed in a pretty waitress outfit. Her touch is obviously upsetting him so much he is likely to spill his tray at any moment.


3. The scene moves outwards to Mrs Weltsova who is sitting on a stool, sipping her cocktail, her feet being worshipped by an obviously drunk customer who is behaving very indecently .


4. Over comes Princess Aurora in her military-style costume and ejects him swiftly from the premises with a well-directed kick from polished boots. No rowdiness in this club!

In the tradition of these series it moves à la ronde back to the first image where the disgraced customer finds himself  collapsed in a heap and half-conscious beside the entrance.

If you live in Japan you can buy the present issue -No 15 – from Amazon.
Regrettably the magazine cannot be bought overseas.

Portrait of Mistress Liberty

A simple theme :- wrapped warmly in a beautiful white fur coat, Mistress Liberty takes her rubber-encased slave for a walk in the early morning, down through the snow-covered gardens of her palatial estate.

Learn more about Sardax portraiture and commissioning at the main Sardax website

Please remember if you are commissioning for a birthday or anniversary to leave a few months as there is usually a waiting list for commissioned artwork.

 

Portrait of Mistress Nikki Whiplash

A recent post featured a collection of paintings with the theme “Thrones”. This new portrait of Mistress Nikki Whiplash  (who was also featured in the Fairytales series) clearly depicts the same theme. Her footstool – and shoe-cleaner – is the painting’s commissioner himself – ‘Nikki’s BBB’, shackled, humbled and also serving as a lamp to illuminate her beauty. To her side a vast cabinet containing a full range of high-heeled shoes, one of Mistress Nikki’s passions.

Learn more about Sardax portraiture and commissioning at the main Sardax website

Please remember if you are commissioning for a birthday or anniversary to leave a few months as there is usually a waiting list for commissioned artwork.

Portrait of Mistress Chloe 2

 

The previous portrait of Mistress Chloe of New York was very well received so another was commissioned to illustrate one of Mistress Chloe’s specialities -wrestling her sub with her strong thighs. Here the commissioner is shown looking suitably vanquished as her gloved hand covers his mouth. He never really stood a chance with both hands bound tautly with rope to his member!

Learn more about Sardax portraiture and commissioning at the main Sardax website

Please remember if you are commissioning for a birthday or anniversary to leave a few months as there is usually a waiting list for commissioned artwork.